Climate Protection Planner To Turn To Virtual Reality And I Hope That Seeing Is Believing

Climate protection planner to Turn To Virtual reality And I Hope that Seeing Is Believing

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Climate researchers Juliano Calil helps a resident of the Turner Station, you use the virtual reality program, which he created, to the expected impacts of sea level rise there.

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Connie Monroe on a button flicks clicks, your wrist and watch as their neighborhood floods.

reed-covered shores are the first to. Then, the baseball fields at the Fleming Park. By the time the sea water senior citizens center, he has flooded the streets, floods, and more than a dozen multiunit brick houses, which you can see.

Monroe moves her head up and down, from side to side, taking in the sobering simulated view. This is what could happen, Turner’s station, a historic African-American community to the Southeast of Baltimore, as the sea levels rise.

“Everything is under water. The school is under water. Our house is under water,” Monroe says. A frown forms under the bulky gray-virtual-reality-headset-over eyes. “Is the water really that high?”

climate change poses many challenges that coastal communities and those who are trying to prepare for its impact, but one of the most important is also one of the most annoying is: How do you want to show people and convince them of a possible future?

animated gif shows a virtual-reality presentation of the sea-level rise in the vicinity of Baltimore, Md.

It is one thing to hear or to read that the sea levels could rise as high as 7 feet in Maryland by the end of the century under the worst-case scenarios, but it is a different “imagine how that will look in your own backyard,” says Jackie Specht, the coastal science program manager for The Nature Conservancy’s Maryland/DC Chapter.

“And if it is difficult to imagine, it is difficult to face and to prioritize, especially when there are so many tangible problems, you [the people], which in the day-to-day.”

the communication of the authenticity and immediacy of the climate threat is enormously important to climate researchers and the mitigation of its causes. But it is also crucial to the communities faced with the coming changes that are already inevitable.

climate-resilience-projects need public support and input.

This is the reason to sit why Monroe and other residents in this last community are addressed, metal chairs, put on virtual reality headsets and watch their houses flood.

Turner Station trying to prepare.

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Turner Station, a historic African-American neighborhood in the vicinity of Baltimore, was Missing from the home of Henrietta, whose cells have, was of crucial importance for medical research. The community is in danger of rising seas.

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“Slogging through the water”

Flooding is nothing new for Turner Station.

The municipality is located on a small Peninsula that juts South into the Patapsco River and the greater Baltimore Harbor. In the West, the tall cranes of the port of Baltimore. In the East, over a wide Creek, Sparrows Point, the former site of a massive steel company and the industrial complex, which, for decades, has most of the community of the people.

Larry Bannerman, a life-long resident and a member of the Board for the Turner Station Conservation Teams, says that water always runs to the South on the Peninsula in large rain events, flooding parts of the city and the low-lying, waterfront baseball fields in the Fleming Park.

it does not, But as they are now.

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Larry Bannerman is part of a community, the team tries to prepare a Turner-Station for the impact of the rise of the oceans.

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“I don’t ever remember running in the outfield and long through the water,” says Bannerman, to boots walk along one of the baseball fields in a pair of rubber. Now, he says, it has become so common that the fields are rarely used.

built in The county has overflows, structures, can flow in which the water in the harbour, along to the end of the Peninsula, and Fleming Park. “But you probably could not see, now, because you are under water,” he says. “You are not supposed to be.”

Plan for the future

sea-level rise is often spoken of as a far-off event, but in Maryland and much of the East coast, are already feeling the impact. Coastal erosion accelerates. Wetlands deteriorated. High flood-flood

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For generations, the children, the Turner Station played baseball in Fleming Park, said Bannerman. Now, the fields don’t see much use because of flooding.

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A 2018-a report by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, says, “The level of Chesapeake Bay water with respect to the land is now rising about three times as fast as it was during the colonial period, threatening the densely built settlements and infrastructure, developed over the interim.”

The threat is not lost on Turner Station, which has a partnership with the port of Baltimore, a couple of non-profit organizations and a local landscape architecture firm, to create a project that would transform the Fleming Park and reduce the risk of future floods.

The project calls for the inclusion of dredged sediments from Baltimore Harbor and the Chesapeake Bay, and use it to beef of the local coast and give it a stronger edge. The design would help offset erosion and provide additional defence against storm surge.

But some in the community worry about the use of dredge material in a public park, in view of the industrial pollution that occurred historically in the area. It is a concern that Bannerman and other project-say heads, is unfounded; any material that would be used would first be checked for contamination.

“We need the whole community on Board with this,” says Gloria Nelson, President of the Turner Station Conservation Teams. To come “instead of [an] Agency to us and tells us: ‘This is what we do in your community.’ “

To get the buy-in and make your case to potential donors — the organizers are going to communicate to incredible lengths, their plans, and the risks of inaction.

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Isaac Hametz, a research landscape architect, explained the coastal resilience project is planned to Fleming Park, a couple from the area residents.

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Mahan Rykiel, the local landscape architecture firm, created the designs for the project, has three-to-bring-dimensional topographic maps of the area and two-dimensional illustrations, to meet the community.

organizers have given the tours in the park, talking about the planned changes.

“you have to communicate a set of tools and a variety of ways to [climate change] to the public, because every person is different and every place is different,” says Isaac Hametz, the company research director.

The virtual reality the program is just the latest and perhaps the most effective step.

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Virtual reality is an immersive experience, the trick can be to think of the human brain, it is real. But the deception of the people is not the goal of the sea level rise simulation used in the Turner Station, says Juliano Calil, one of the developers of the program.

The goal, he says, “to start a conversation and help people visualize the effects [of climate change], and the solutions, and also discuss the trade-offs between them.”

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Juliano Calil is preparing the launch of its drone over Long Beach, Calif., for a virtual reality program that he is creating for the Simulation of the impact of sea level rise on the area.

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Calil is an associate professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey in California, and a research fellow focused on coastal adaptation. He is also a licensed drone operator and one of the first users of virtual reality.

A few years ago he had the idea of pairing these skills with his climate, and highlighted a rise in the sea level simulation for his current home town of Santa Cruz, California.

He recruited a video game designer to create the models, with elevation maps, aerial he footage the footage with his drone, and the recent rise in sea-level projections.

“We spent a week in my living room and have a prototype in VR-and it worked,” Calil says. “And I think this is indicative of what we need to address climate change: no matter what skills you have, it is a way that you can apply, which will help to solve the problems.”

The Santa Cruz program is to use in a local library for the residents, and Calil has begun, a further simulation for Long Beach, California. There is, instead of a lower-income neighborhood of Turner Station, is the endangered area of a narrow strip of expensive beach houses.

Each project shows that the municipalities and the coast, as you look today from the bird’s perspective. A slider at the bottom can bring the user, the level of the sea as the narrative explains, what to see, the viewer to.

Future versions, Calil says that will integrate proposed solutions. If a municipality is considering the construction of a sea wall, for example, “we can show the sea wall, and views on the impact to the beach,” he says. “You have a sea wall, but in the course of time, you can lose the beach.”

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Using a virtual reality program, three-dimensional cards and illustrated prints, the organizers of the Fleming-Park-search project, to inspire community participation.

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you Give people a clear sense of these trade-offs, as he says, should be for a better-informed discussion of climate-resilience projects, and the people to the risks of track of interest and participation.

In the case of Turner Station community meeting in southeastern Baltimore County, Eric Johnson, pastor of the Union Church, the Baptist one of the virtual reality far-headsets, and blinks as his eyes adjust to the auditorium, bright lights.

Asked about his experiences, he pauses for a moment.

“you hear about global warming and the effects of it, but to really see be able, in real-time an eye-opener,” he says. “It shows you, this is something we needed to work, like, yesterday.”

Released on Sun, 24 Nov 2019 14:10:42 +0000

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